Monthly Archives: June 2013

Beef Brisket Take 2

Last year (almost a year to the day I find), I posted Smokin’ Chick’s Beef Brisket. I smoked another one recently-my husband says it was the best brisket he’s ever had!  He said the same thing  last time.  I guess I’m 2 for 2 on brisket.

Some people are intimidated by a brisket or any cut of beef that is known to be tough.  Low and slow with plenty of moisture is the way to cook those cuts.  My brisket was 8.33 pounds.  It was smoked on the grill just under 3 1/2 hours, then in the crock pot on low for another 8 or 9 hours.  It pulled apart quite easily and was very moist.  The rub gave it a nice coating and flavor that required no sauce (but I use sauce anyway).  If you don’t want it pulled, make sure you slice the meat against the grain and not with it.

Smoked Brisket Part 2 (7)

Just off the grill.

For the rub you will need:  allspice, garlic powder, onion powder, ground mustard and ground ginger.  Place the brisket over 2 sheets of plastic wrap, layered over each other at right angles.  I just sprinkled the spices over both sides of the brisket liberally and rubbed them in.  Wrap the brisket tightly and refrigerate overnight or at least 8 hours.  Smoked Brisket Part 2 (8)

Smoked Brisket Part 2

Small piles of coals are for later

Pull the meat out of the refrigerator about 30 minutes before grill time, to relax the muscle fibers.  Prepare the coals and soak the wood you will be using for the smoke.  I used apple wood chips (I purchase the wood chips from Lowe’s if I don’t have any oak or cherry wood chunks from the trees on our property).Smoked Brisket Part 2 (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the coals are hot, sear each side of the brisket 3-4 minutes to seal in the brisket’s natural moisture.  Opposite the coals, on the coal grate, place a foil pan filled with a liquid.  For this brisket, I used cranberry juice.  Once it is seared, move the brisket to the opposite side, fat side up, add more coals to the main pile and close the lid. 

Seared on both sides

Seared on both sides

The temperature peaked at 325 degrees F.  I had all vents on the lid and the kettle wide open.  If the temperature gets above 325, adjust the vents to regulate the temperature.  The more open the vents, the more oxygen and air flow gets to the coals.  Closing the vents a bit will decrease the oxygen and air flow, thus decreasing the temperature.  Once the temperature dropped below 250, I took the brisket off and wrapped it in foil to further cook and then cool. 

After 3 1/2 hours on grill

After 3 1/2 hours on grill

Smoked Brisket Part 2 (12)

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

I was saving the brisket for a later time, so it went in the freezer for a couple of days.  I took it out the day before I was putting it in the crock pot to thaw in the refrigerator.  For the crock pot, I kept the brisket in the foil, opening it, but forming a bowl from the foil.  I poured enough water around the bowl to provide enough moisture for a lengthy time in the crock pot, but not so much it would get into the foil bowl.  I did not want to take my brisket for a swim!  The brisket slow cooked between 8 and 9 hours.

Out of the crock pot

Out of the crock pot

Until next time, Grill, Baby, Grill!

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin

I enjoy coming up with new rubs, marinades and sauces for pork.  Pork is one of those meats that just about anything goes.  The tenderloin is my favorite cut of pork.  I buy the 10-15 pounders when they are on sale and cut them up when I get home.  I leave bigger sections, such as the 2.5 pounds used in this recipe, and pork chops any thickness I want.  The sections are then put in freezer bags and frozen until I’m ready to grill!

What you need:  2.5 pound boneless pork tenderloin, rinsed and patted dry with paper towels.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (5)

For the rub:
Onion powder
Garlic powder
Basil flakes
Ground coriander
Fresh cracked black pepper
Sprinkle all liberally (except maybe garlic-you might want to do that  lightly) over all of tenderloin. Rub in, cover the tenderloin and refrigerate for at least an hour, removing about half an hour before grilling.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (2)
Balsamic Glaze:
1 cup Balsamic vinegar
up to 2 tbsp honey
Bring to a boil, reduce heat and continue heating until volume is reduced by half. Let cool to room temperature.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (12)

Prepare a fire for indirect cooking. Spread coals when most are ashen and temperature is high heat.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (6)

Sear all sides of tenderloin, about 5 minutes each side.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (9)

Remember to NOT use a fork to turn the meat.  No piercing!  Watch and put out flare-ups when searing the fatty side. Move to the side of the grill opposite the fire, fatty side up and add more charcoal, about 5 briquettes.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (3)

For pork, I sometimes insert a thermometer to make sure it is done. Internal “doneness” temperature for pork is 150-165 degrees F. Brush some of the glaze on the top of the tenderloin and put the lid on the grill. If you can maintain a cooking temperature around 300 degrees, a 2.5 pound tenderloin should be done after 2 hours. Mine wasn’t, so I brushed more glaze on it, wrapped it in foil and finished it in the oven at 400 degrees F for about 20 minutes.

I served the pork with a caprese salad.  This link takes you to a recipe.  The only difference in how I serve it and this recipe is that I dress it with olive oil and  balsamic vinegar.

Balsamic Glazed Pork Tenderloin (13)

Until next time, Grill, Baby, Grill!